Foundation for Diet and Health

The best perspective for your health

The best perspective for your health

The best perspective for your health

The best perspective for your health

Black Fall Quinoa with Radicchio, Fennel, and Mushrooms

With its sharp, bitter, and intense flavor, radicchio doesn’t only complement fennel and mushrooms, it also provides many valuable nutrients — as does quinoa.
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vegan

30min   50min easy
60/17/24  LA20:1ALA
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Ingredients (for servings, )

Click for nutrient tables
For the quinoa
2 ½ ozQuinoa, uncooked
200 mlTap water (7 oz)
For the mushrooms
5 ½ ozButton mushrooms
½ tbspLow-sodium soy sauce (genen shoyu) (0.28 oz)
½ tbspOlive oil (0.24 oz)
Assembly
1 Radicchio, Italian chicory
1 Fennel bulb
2 tbspParsley, fresh (0.27 oz)
2 tbspPine nuts (0.48 oz)
1 Lemon, raw, without peel
1 tbspOlive oil (0.47 oz)
½ tspSea salt
1 dashBlack pepper

Equipment

  • stove
  • sieve
  • citrus juicer (lemon squeezer)
  • saucepan

Type of preparation

  • cook
  • chop or grind
  • squeeze
  • meld

Preparation

  1. For the quinoa
    Rinse the quinoa under running water in a sieve. Transfer to a saucepan, add the water, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and let simmer for 15 minutes. Then pour off any remaining water.

  2. Matthew Kenney recommends using black quinoa.

  3. For the mushrooms
    Clean the mushrooms and cut into thin slices. Marinate mushrooms with tamari and oil for approximately 10 minutes.

  4. The original recipe calls for cremini mushrooms.

    We use a low-salt variety soy sauce called genen shoyu whereas the original recipe calls for the gluten-free soy sauce tamari.

  5. Assembly
    Clean the radicchio and cut both the radicchio and fennel into thin slices. Finely chop the parsley and then add to the radicchio and fennel.

  6. Squeeze the juice from the lemon and add to the vegetable mixture along with the olive oil, sea salt, and freshly ground black pepper.

  7. Serving
    While quinoa is still warm, toss all ingredients together. Allow to marinate for at least 10 minutes before serving so that the flavors can combine.

  8. This recipe makes 2–4 servings, depending on whether you are serving it as a side or main dish.

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Notes about recipe

With its sharp, bitter, and intense flavor, radicchio doesn’t only complement fennel and mushrooms, it also provides many valuable nutrients — as does quinoa.

Quinoa: Quinoa is a pseudograin that originated in the South American Andes. The quinoa sold commercially has had the bitter coating called saponin removed. Quinoa is available in a number of different varieties and colors. White quinoa has a light texture when cooked whereas red quinoa has a somewhat richer taste and holds its shape better. Black quinoa holds its shape the best and has an earthy, slightly sweet flavor. It is best to wash quinoa before cooking to remove any remaining traces of the bitter saponin. Quinoa is gluten-free and contains more protein, magnesium, and iron than the other common types of grains. It also contains all of the essential amino acids, including lysine!

Mushrooms: White button mushrooms are the most common type of cultivated mushrooms. They are firm and have a mild flavor. You can eat button mushrooms cooked, fried, and also raw — for example, in salads. Cremini mushrooms are a special variety that is even firmer than white mushrooms and hold up better in sauces and soups. They also have a fuller taste. Unlike wild mushrooms, cultivated mushrooms are sold year-round in grocery stores and markets.

Fennel: Fennel originated in the Mediterranean region and Asia Minor, and both the bulb and seeds are used as an ingredient in raw and cooked dishes. IFennel is in the Apiaceae or Umbelliferae family, as is celery. The white to light-green bulb is composed of several layers and therefore has a similar structure to that of the onion. Fennel has an intense flavor that is a result of the high amounts of essential oils it contains. The essential oils have many health-promoting properties. For example, they support digestion, are thought to inhibit inflammation, and strengthen the stomach. Fennel bulbs have green tops that are reminiscent of dill.

Reducing sugar and salt: For health reasons, we have deliberately reduced the amount of salt and oil. You can read more about this topic in our in-depth review of the book Salt Sugar Fat by Michael Moss. The reason the salt content is still too high is because of the soy sauce, which contains 5–6 % sodium.

Tips

Cleaning mushrooms: It works best to clean mushrooms dry using a brush. If there is a lot of visible dirt, you can wash them under running water. Never wash mushrooms in standing water as they absorb water quickly. Don’t store mushrooms at high temperature or in a damp place as this will cause them to spoil more quickly.

Alternate preparation

Varieties of quinoa: Instead of black quinoa, you can also use red or white quinoa. Don’t let it cook too long or it will get mushy.

When you need to save time: If you are in a hurry, you can also use precooked quinoa. For this recipe for 2–4 servings, you would need 200 g.