Foundation Diet and Health

The best perspective for your health

The best perspective for your health

The best perspective for your health

The best perspective for your health

Vegetable broth

Vegetable broth with little added salt has a sodium content of 234 mg instead of the usual 400 mg. Broth is made up of 98% water.
Water 98.2%  100/00/00  LA : ALA
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Vegetable broth is available in nearly every supermarket in a wide range of forms, from powders and solid cubes to liquids, but many of them contain flavor enhancers and additives. If you make homemade vegetable broth, you can use all natural ingredients and alter the flavor to your preference. High-quality broths provide an important basis for a variety of dishes and appetizers including soups, sauces, and stews.

General information:

From Wikipedia: Broth is a savory liquid made of water in which bones, meat, fish, or vegetables have been simmered. It can be eaten alone, but is most commonly used to prepare other dishes such as soups, gravies, and sauces.

Commercially prepared liquid broths are available, typically for chicken broth, beef broth, and vegetable broth. In North America dehydrated meat stock, in the form of tablets, is called a bouillon cube. Industrially produced bouillon cubes were commercialized by Maggi in 1908 and by Oxo in 1910. Using commercially prepared broths allows cooks to save time in the kitchen.”

Terminology:

“Many cooks and food writers use the terms broth and stock interchangeably, and even when distinctions are made, they often vary from person to person.

However, a traditional distinction between stock and broth is that stocks are made primarily from animal bones, as opposed to meat, and therefore contain more gelatin, giving them a thicker texture. Another distinction that is sometimes made is that stock is cooked longer than broth and therefore has a more intense flavor. A third possible distinction is that stock is left unseasoned for use in other recipes, while broth is salted and otherwise seasoned and can be eaten alone.

Bouillon is the French word for "broth", and is usually used as a synonym for it.”

Refining:

“Broth has been made for many years using the animal bones which, traditionally, are boiled in a cooking pot for long periods to extract the flavor and nutrients. The bones may or may not have meat still on them.

Egg whites may be added during simmering when it is necessary to clarify (i.e., purify, or refine a broth for a cleaner presentation). The egg whites will coagulate, trapping sediment and turbidity into an easily strained mass. Not allowing the original preparation to boil will increase the clarity.

Roasted bones will add a rich flavor to the broth but also a dark color.”

Cultural distinctions:

In Britain, a broth is defined as a soup in which there are solid pieces of meat or fish, along with some vegetables. A broth is usually made with a stock or plain water as its base, with meat or fish added while being brought to a boil, and vegetables added later. Being a thin and watery soup, broth is frequently made more substantial by adding rice, barley or pulses.

In East Asia (particularly Japan), a form of kelp called kombu is often used as the basis for broths (called dashi in Japanese).

In the Maldives the tuna broth known as garudiya is a basic food item, but it is not eaten as a soup in the general sense of the term.”

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