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The best perspective for your health

Sweet potato

Unlike regular potatoes, sweet potatoes are not part of the nightshade family. They owe their sweet flavor to the natural sugars they contain.
77%
Water
 93
Macronutrient carbohydrates 92.55%
/07
Macronutrient proteins 7.22%
/00
Macronutrient fats 0.23%
 

The three ratios show the percentage by weight of macronutrients (carbohydrates / proteins / fats) of the dry matter (excl. water).

Ω-6 (LA, <0.1g)
Omega-6 fatty acid such as linoleic acid (LA)
 : Ω-3 (ALA, <0.1g)
Omega-3 fatty acid such as alpha-linolenic acid (ALA)
 = 0:0

Omega-6 ratio to omega-3 fatty acids should not exceed a total of 5:1. Link to explanation.

Values are too small to be relevant.

Sweet potatoes are not actually potatoes. While they grow as underground tubers, in contrast to regular potatoes they are not part of the nightshade family. Sweet potato leaves are edible and are a food staple in many tropical countries. They have a high water content and as such can’t be stored for long periods of time like regular potatoes. However, careful handling (e.g., avoiding bruises) can extend the storage life. Since certain varieties contain an appreciable amount of hydrogen cyanide, you should carefully select the type of sweet potato you will be using.

General information:

From Wikipedia: “The sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) is a dicotyledonous plant that belongs to the family Convolvulaceae. Its large, starchy, sweet-tasting, tuberous roots are a root vegetable. The young leaves and shoots are sometimes eaten as greens. The sweet potato is only distantly related to the potato (Solanum tuberosum) and does not belong to the nightshade family, Solanaceae, but both families belong to the same taxonomic order, the Solanales.”

“The origin and domestication of sweet potato is thought to be in either Central America or South America. In Central America, sweet potatoes were domesticated at least 5,000 years ago.In South America, Peruvian sweet potato remnants dating as far back as 8000 BC have been found.”

Culinary uses:

“Although the leaves and shoots are also edible, the starchy tuberous roots are by far the most important product. In some tropical areas, they are a staple food crop.”

“Candied sweet potatoes are a side dish consisting mainly of sweet potatoes prepared with brown sugar, marshmallows, maple syrup, molasses, orange juice, marron glacé, or other sweet ingredients. It is often served in America on Thanksgiving. Sweet potato casserole is a side dish of mashed sweet potatoes in a casserole dish, topped with a brown sugar and pecan topping. Sweet potato pie is also a traditional favorite dish in Southern U.S. cuisine. ... Sweet potato fries or chips are another common preparation, and are made by julienning and deep frying sweet potatoes, in the fashion of French fried potatoes. ... Baked sweet potatoes are sometimes offered in restaurants as an alternative to baked potatoes. They are often topped with brown sugar and butter. Sweet potato butter can be cooked into a gourmet spread. Sweet potato mash is served as a side dish, often at Thanksgiving dinner or with barbecue.”

Nutrition:

“Besides simple starches, raw sweet potatoes are rich in complex carbohydrates, dietary fiber and beta-carotene (a provitamin A carotenoid), while having moderate contents of other micronutrients, including vitamin B5, vitamin B6 and manganese. When cooked by baking, small variable changes in micronutrient density occur to include a higher content of vitamin C at 24% of the Daily Value per 100 g serving.

The Center for Science in the Public Interest ranked the nutritional value of sweet potatoes as highest among several other foods.

Sweet potato cultivars with dark orange flesh have more beta-carotene than those with light-colored flesh, and their increased cultivation is being encouraged in Africa where vitamin A deficiency is a serious health problem. A 2012 study of 10,000 households in Uganda found that children eating beta-carotene enriched sweet potatoes suffered less vitamin A deficiency than those not consuming as much beta-carotene.”

Cultivation:

“They grow well in many farming conditions and have few natural enemies; pesticides are rarely needed. Sweet potatoes are grown on a variety of soils, but well-drained, light- and medium-textured soils with a pH range of 4.5-7.0 are more favorable for the plant. They can be grown in poor soils with little fertilizer. However, sweet potatoes are very sensitive to aluminum toxicity and will die about six weeks after planting if lime is not applied at planting in this type of soil. Because they are sown by vine cuttings rather than seeds, sweet potatoes are relatively easy to plant. Because the rapidly growing vines shade out weeds, little weeding is needed. ...

In the Southeastern United States, sweet potatoes are traditionally cured to improve storage, flavor, and nutrition, and to allow wounds on the periderm of the harvested root to heal. Proper curing requires drying the freshly dug roots on the ground for two to three hours, then storage at 29–32 °C (85–90 °F) with 90 to 95% relative humidity from five to fourteen days. Cured sweet potatoes can keep for thirteen months when stored at 13–15 °C (55–59 °F) with >90% relative humidity. Colder temperatures injure the roots.”

Nutrient tables

The complete nutritional information, coverage of the daily requirement and comparison values with other ingredients can be found in the following nutrient tables.

Nutritional Information
per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Energy86 kcal
360 kJ
4.3%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 2000kcal
Fat/Lipids0.05 g0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 70g
Saturated Fats0.02 g0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 20g
Carbohydrates (inc.dietary fiber)20 g7.5%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 270g
Sugars4.2 g4.6%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 90g
Fiber3.0 g12.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 25g
Protein/Albumin1.6 g3.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 50g
Cooking Salt (Na:55.0 mg)140 mg5.8%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 2.4g
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA.
Fat/Lipids
Carbohydrates
Protein/Albumin
Cooking Salt

Essential micronutrients with the highest proportions per 100g 2000 kcal
VitVitamin A, as RAE 709 µg89.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 µg
ElemPotassium, K 337 mg17.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2'000 mg
MinCopper, Cu 0.15 mg15.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.0 mg
VitVitamin B6 (pyridoxine) 0.21 mg15.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.4 mg
ProtTryptophan (Trp, W) 0.03 g13.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.25 g
VitPantothenic acid (vitamin B5) 0.80 mg13.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 6.0 mg
MinManganese, Mn 0.26 mg13.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2.0 mg
ProtThreonine (Thr, T) 0.08 g9.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.93 g
ElemMagnesium, Mg 25 mg7.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 375 mg
Sodium, Na 55 mg7.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 mg

Detailed micronutrients and daily requirement coverage per 100g

Explanations of nutrient tables in general

The majority of the nutritional information comes from the USDA (US Department of Agriculture). This means that the information for natural products is often incomplete or only given within broader categories, whereas in most cases products made from these have more complete information displayed.

If we take flaxseed, for example, the important essential amino acid ALA (omega-3) is only included in an overarching category whereas for flaxseed oil ALA is listed specifically. In time, we will be able to change this, but it will require a lot of work. An “i” appears behind ingredients that have been adjusted and an explanation appears when you hover over this symbol.

For Erb Muesli, the original calculations resulted in 48 % of the daily requirement of ALA — but with the correction, we see that the muesli actually covers >100 % of the necessary recommendation for the omega-3 fatty acid ALA. Our goal is to eventually be able to compare the nutritional value of our recipes with those that are used in conventional western lifestyles.

Essential fatty acids per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Alpha-Linolenic acid; ALA; 18:3 omega-3 0.00 g< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the CH-EDI-Verordnung: 2.0 g
Linoleic acid; LA; 18:2 omega-6 0.01 g< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the CH-EDI-Verordnung: 10 g

Essential amino acids per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Tryptophan (Trp, W) 0.03 g13.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.25 g
Threonine (Thr, T) 0.08 g9.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.93 g
Phenylalanine (Phe, F) 0.09 g6.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.6 g
Valine (Val, V) 0.09 g5.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.6 g
Isoleucine (Ile, I) 0.06 g4.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.2 g
Leucine (Leu, L) 0.09 g4.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 2.4 g
Lysine (Lys, K) 0.07 g4.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.9 g
Methionine (Met, M) 0.03 g3.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.93 g

Vitamins per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Vitamin A, as RAE 709 µg89.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 µg
Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) 0.21 mg15.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.4 mg
Pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) 0.80 mg13.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 6.0 mg
Thiamine (vitamin B1) 0.08 mg7.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.1 mg
Folate, as the active form of folic acid (née vitamin B9 and 11 µg6.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 200 µg
Riboflavin (vitamin B2) 0.06 mg4.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.4 mg
Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) 2.4 mg3.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 80 mg
Niacin (née vitamin B3) 0.56 mg3.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 16 mg
Vitamin E, as a-TEs 0.26 mg2.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 12 mg
Vitamin K 1.8 µg2.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 75 µg
Vitamin D 0 µg< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 5.0 µg

Essential macroelements (macronutrients) per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Potassium, K 337 mg17.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2'000 mg
Magnesium, Mg 25 mg7.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 375 mg
Phosphorus, P 47 mg7.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 700 mg
Sodium, Na 55 mg7.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 mg
Calcium, Ca 30 mg4.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 mg

Essential trace elements (micronutrients) per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Copper, Cu 0.15 mg15.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.0 mg
Manganese, Mn 0.26 mg13.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2.0 mg
Iron, Fe 0.61 mg4.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 14 mg
Zinc, Zn 0.30 mg3.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 10 mg
Selenium, Se 0.60 µg1.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 55 µg
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