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The best perspective for your health

Carrot, raw

Carrots are a low-calorie vegetable with a relatively high level of carotenoids. They can be used to make either raw or cooked recipes.
We have provided the missing values for the nutritional information from the USDA database for this ingredient.
88%
Water
 89
Macronutrient carbohydrates 89.12%
/09
Macronutrient proteins 8.65%
/02
Macronutrient fats 2.23%
 

The three ratios show the percentage by weight of macronutrients (carbohydrates / proteins / fats) of the dry matter (excl. water).

Ω-6 (LA, 0.1g)
Omega-6 fatty acid such as linoleic acid (LA)
 : Ω-3 (ALA, <0.1g)
Omega-3 fatty acid such as alpha-linolenic acid (ALA)
 = 0:0

Omega-6 ratio to omega-3 fatty acids should not exceed a total of 5:1. Link to explanation.

Values are too small to be relevant.

Carrots are a favorite low-calorie raw food and are known for their high levels of carotenoids, which give them their characteristic color.

General information:

From Wikipedia: “The carrot (Daucus carota subsp.sativus) is a root vegetable, usually orange in colour, though purple, black, red, white, and yellow varieties exist.

Carrots are a domesticated form of the wild carrot Daucus carota, native to Europe and southwestern Asia. The plant probably originated in Persia and was originally cultivated for its leaves and seeds. ... The domestic carrot has been selectively bred for its greatly enlarged and more palatable, less woody-textured taproot.

The carrot is a biennial plant in the umbellifer family Apiaceae. It grows a rosette of leaves in the spring and summer while building up the stout taproot. Fast-growing varieties mature within three months of sowing the seed, while slower-maturing varieties are harvested in autumn and winter.”

Culinary uses:

“Nowadays, the most commonly eaten part of the plant is the taproot, although the greens are sometimes eaten as well.”

“Carrots can be eaten in a variety of ways. Only 3 percent of the β-carotene in raw carrots is released during digestion: this can be improved to 39% by pulping, cooking and adding cooking oil. Alternatively they may be chopped and boiled, fried or steamed, and cooked in soups and stews, as well as baby and pet foods. A well-known dish is carrots julienne.”

Nutritional value:

“The roots contain high quantities of alpha and beta carotene, and are a good source of vitamin K and vitamin B6.”

“The carrot gets its characteristic, bright orange colour from β-carotene and lesser amounts of α-carotene, γ-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin. α- and β-carotenes are partly metabolized into vitamin A, providing more than 100% of the Daily Value (DV) per 100 g serving of carrots. Carrots are also a good source of vitamin K (13% DV) and vitamin B6 (11% DV), but otherwise have modest content of other essential nutrients (right table).

Carrots are 88% water, 4.7% sugar, 0.9% protein, 2.8% dietary fiber, 1% ash and 0.2% fat. Carrot dietary fiber comprises mostly cellulose, with smaller proportions of hemicellulose, lignin and starch. Free sugars in carrot include sucrose, glucose and fructose.

The lutein and zeaxanthin carotenoids characteristic of carrots are studied for their potential roles in vision and eye health.”

Storage:

“Carrots can be stored for several months in the refrigerator or over winter in a moist, cool place. For long term storage, unwashed carrots can be placed in a bucket between layers of sand, a 50/50 mix of sand and wood shavings, or in soil. A temperature range of 32 to 40 °F (0 to 5 °C) is best.”

Production:

“Carrots are one of the ten most economically important vegetable crops in the world. In 2013, world production of carrots (combined with turnips) was 37.2 million tonnes, with China producing 45% of the world total (16.8 million tonnes, table). Other major producers were Uzbekistan and Russia (4% of world total each), the United States(3%) and Ukraine (2%).”

Cultivars:

Carrot cultivars can be grouped into two broad classes, eastern carrots and western carrots.

  • "Eastern" (a European and American continent reference) carrots were domesticated in Persia (probably in the lands of modern-day Iran and Afghanistan within West Asia) during the 10th century, or possibly earlier. Specimens of the "eastern" carrot that survive to the present day are commonly purple or yellow, and often have branched roots. The purple colour common in these carrots comes from anthocyanin pigments.
  • The western carrot emerged in the Netherlands in the 17th century. The orange colour results from abundant carotenes in these cultivars.

The myth about “night vision”:

“The provitamin A beta-carotene from carrots does not actually help people to see in the dark unless they suffer from a deficiency of vitamin A. This myth was propaganda used by the Royal Air Force during the Second World War ... to disguise advances in radar technology and the use of red lights on instrument panels.”

Nutrient tables

The complete nutritional information, coverage of the daily requirement and comparison values with other ingredients can be found in the following nutrient tables.

Nutritional Information
per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Energy41 kcal
172 kJ
2.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 2000kcal
Fat/Lipids0.24 g0.3%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 70g
Saturated Fats0.04 g0.2%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 20g
Carbohydrates (inc.dietary fiber)9.6 g3.5%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 270g
Sugars4.7 g5.3%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 90g
Fiber2.8 g11.2%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 25g
Protein/Albumin0.93 g1.9%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 50g
Cooking Salt (Na:69.0 mg)175 mg7.3%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 2.4g
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA.
Fat/Lipids
Carbohydrates
Protein/Albumin
Cooking Salt

Essential micronutrients with the highest proportions per 100g 2000 kcal
VitVitamin A, as RAE 835 µg104.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 µg
ProtThreonine (Thr, T) 0.19 g21.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.93 g
VitVitamin K 13 µg18.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 75 µg
ElemPotassium, K 320 mg16.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2'000 mg
VitVitamin B6 (pyridoxine) 0.14 mg10.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.4 mg
VitFolate, as the active form of folic acid (née vitamin B9 and 19 µg10.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 200 µg
VitBiotin (ex vitamin B7, H) 5.0 µg10.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 50 µg
Sodium, Na 69 mg9.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 mg
MinManganese, Mn 0.14 mg7.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2.0 mg
VitVitamin C (ascorbic acid) 5.9 mg7.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 80 mg

Detailed micronutrients and daily requirement coverage per 100g

Explanations of nutrient tables in general

The majority of the nutritional information comes from the USDA (US Department of Agriculture). This means that the information for natural products is often incomplete or only given within broader categories, whereas in most cases products made from these have more complete information displayed.

If we take flaxseed, for example, the important essential amino acid ALA (omega-3) is only included in an overarching category whereas for flaxseed oil ALA is listed specifically. In time, we will be able to change this, but it will require a lot of work. An “i” appears behind ingredients that have been adjusted and an explanation appears when you hover over this symbol.

For Erb Muesli, the original calculations resulted in 48 % of the daily requirement of ALA — but with the correction, we see that the muesli actually covers >100 % of the necessary recommendation for the omega-3 fatty acid ALA. Our goal is to eventually be able to compare the nutritional value of our recipes with those that are used in conventional western lifestyles.

Essential fatty acids per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Linoleic acid; LA; 18:2 omega-6 0.12 g1.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the CH-EDI-Verordnung: 10 g
Alpha-Linolenic acid; ALA; 18:3 omega-3 0.00 g< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the CH-EDI-Verordnung: 2.0 g

Essential amino acids per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Threonine (Thr, T) 0.19 g21.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.93 g
Isoleucine (Ile, I) 0.08 g6.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.2 g
Tryptophan (Trp, W) 0.01 g5.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.25 g
Lysine (Lys, K) 0.10 g5.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.9 g
Leucine (Leu, L) 0.10 g4.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 2.4 g
Phenylalanine (Phe, F) 0.06 g4.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.6 g
Valine (Val, V) 0.07 g4.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.6 g
Methionine (Met, M) 0.02 g2.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.93 g

Vitamins per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Vitamin A, as RAE 835 µg104.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 µg
Vitamin K 13 µg18.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 75 µg
Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) 0.14 mg10.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.4 mg
Folate, as the active form of folic acid (née vitamin B9 and 19 µg10.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 200 µg
Biotin (ex vitamin B7, H) 5.0 µg10.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 50 µg
Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) 5.9 mg7.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 80 mg
Thiamine (vitamin B1) 0.07 mg6.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.1 mg
Niacin (née vitamin B3) 0.98 mg6.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 16 mg
Vitamin E, as a-TEs 0.66 mg6.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 12 mg
Pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) 0.27 mg5.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 6.0 mg
Riboflavin (vitamin B2) 0.06 mg4.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.4 mg
Vitamin D 0 µg< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 5.0 µg

Essential macroelements (macronutrients) per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Potassium, K 320 mg16.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2'000 mg
Sodium, Na 69 mg9.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 mg
Phosphorus, P 35 mg5.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 700 mg
Calcium, Ca 33 mg4.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 mg
Magnesium, Mg 12 mg3.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 375 mg

Essential trace elements (micronutrients) per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Manganese, Mn 0.14 mg7.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2.0 mg
Copper, Cu 0.04 mg5.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.0 mg
Iron, Fe 0.30 mg2.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 14 mg
Zinc, Zn 0.24 mg2.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 10 mg
Iod, I (Jod, J) 3.1 µg2.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 150 µg
Fluorine, F 3.2 µg< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 3'500 µg
Selenium, Se 0.10 µg< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 55 µg
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