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The best perspective for your health

Fresh ginger

Ginger is used as a spice and a medicinal plant (e.g., to treat gastrointestinal problems). It owes its distinctive spicy and citrus flavor mainly to gingerol.
We have provided the missing values for the nutritional information from the USDA database for this ingredient.
79%
Water
 87
Macronutrient carbohydrates 87.36%
/09
Macronutrient proteins 8.95%
/04
Macronutrient fats 3.69%
 

The three ratios show the percentage by weight of macronutrients (carbohydrates / proteins / fats) of the dry matter (excl. water).

Ω-6 (LA, 0.1g)
Omega-6 fatty acid such as linoleic acid (LA)
 : Ω-3 (ALA, <0.1g)
Omega-3 fatty acid such as alpha-linolenic acid (ALA)
 = 0:0

Omega-6 ratio to omega-3 fatty acids should not exceed a total of 5:1. Link to explanation.

Values are too small to be relevant.

Ginger is becoming increasingly popular because of its health benefits and its distinctive flavor it owes to the substance gingerol. Raw and dried ginger have been used to treat a number of health problems in traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years.

General information:

From Wikipedia: “Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is a flowering plant whose rhizome, ginger root or simply ginger, is widely used as a spice or a folk medicine.

It is a herbaceous perennial which grows annual stems about a meter tall bearing narrow green leaves and yellow flowers. Ginger is in the family Zingiberaceae, to which also belong turmeric (Curcuma longa), cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum), and galangal. Ginger originated in the tropical rainforest in Southern Asia. Although ginger no longer grows wild, it is thought to have originated on the Indian subcontinent. ... Ginger was exported to Europe via India in the first century AD as a result of the lucrative spice trade and was used extensively by the Romans.

The distantly related dicots in the genus Asarum are commonly called wild ginger because of their similar taste.”

Nutritional value:

“In 100 grams, ground dried ginger (10% water) provides numerous essential nutrients in high content, particularly the dietary mineral manganese as a multiple of its Daily Value (DV, table). In a typical spice serving amount of one US tablespoon or 5 g, however, ginger powder provides negligible content of essential nutrients, with the exception of manganese present as 79% of DV.

Due to its higher content of water (80%), raw ginger root has lower overall nutrient content when expressed per 100 grams.”

“The characteristic fragrance and flavor of ginger result from volatile oils that compose 1-3% of the weight of fresh ginger, primarily consisting of zingerone, shogaols and gingerols ... Zingerone is produced from gingerols during drying, having lower pungency and a spicy-sweet aroma.”

Culinary uses:

“Ginger produces a hot, fragrant kitchen spice. Young ginger rhizomes are juicy and fleshy with a very mild taste. They are often pickled in vinegar or sherry as a snack or cooked as an ingredient in many dishes. They can be steeped in boiling water to make ginger tisane, to which honey is often added; sliced orange or lemon fruit may be added. Ginger can be made into candy, or ginger wine, which has been made commercially since 1740.

Mature ginger rhizomes are fibrous and nearly dry. The juice from ginger roots is often used as a seasoning in Indian recipes and is a common ingredient of Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Vietnamese, and many South Asian cuisines for flavoring dishes such as seafood, meat, and vegetarian dishes.

Fresh ginger can be substituted for ground ginger at a ratio of six to one, although the flavors of fresh and dried ginger are somewhat different. Powdered dry ginger root is typically used as a flavoring for recipes such as gingerbread, cookies, crackers and cakes, ginger ale, and ginger beer.

Candied ginger, or crystallized ginger, is the root cooked in sugar until soft, and is a type of confectionery.

Fresh ginger may be peeled before eating. For longer-term storage, the ginger can be placed in a plastic bag and refrigerated or frozen.”

Medicinal uses:

“Gingerroot contains a viscous balsam ... that consists of essential oils and pungent gingerols and shogaols. Preparations made from gingerroot are thought to have antioxidant, antiemetic (antinausea), and anti-inflammatory properties and also to stimulate the production of gastric juice, saliva, and bile as well as digestive activity. As a result, ginger is used in traditional Eastern medicine to treat rheumatism, muscle pain, and colds. The Kommission E (scientific advisory board in Germany) and the European Scientific Cooperative on Phytotherapy (ESCOP) endorse the use of gingerroot in the case of gastrointestinal problems and nausea.*”

Composition and safety:

“If consumed in reasonable quantities, ginger has few negative side effects. It is on the FDA's "generally recognized as safe" list, though it does interact with some medications, including the anticoagulant drug "warfar,," and the cardiovascular drug, "nifedipi..". ”

Note (italics): * = Translation from a German Wikipedia entry

Nutrient tables

The complete nutritional information, coverage of the daily requirement and comparison values with other ingredients can be found in the following nutrient tables.

Nutritional Information
per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Energy80 kcal
335 kJ
4.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 2000kcal
Fat/Lipids0.75 g1.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 70g
Saturated Fats0.20 g1.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 20g
Carbohydrates (inc.dietary fiber)18 g6.6%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 270g
Sugars1.7 g1.9%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 90g
Fiber2.0 g8.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 25g
Protein/Albumin1.8 g3.6%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 50g
Cooking Salt (Na:13.0 mg)33 mg1.4%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 2.4g
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA.
Fat/Lipids
Carbohydrates
Protein/Albumin
Cooking Salt

Essential micronutrients with the highest proportions per 100g 2000 kcal
MinCopper, Cu 0.23 mg23.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.0 mg
ElemPotassium, K 415 mg21.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2'000 mg
VitVitamin B6 (pyridoxine) 0.16 mg11.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.4 mg
ElemMagnesium, Mg 43 mg11.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 375 mg
MinManganese, Mn 0.23 mg11.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2.0 mg
VitFolate, as the active form of folic acid (née vitamin B9 and 11 µg6.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 200 µg
VitVitamin C (ascorbic acid) 5.0 mg6.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 80 mg
ElemPhosphorus, P 34 mg5.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 700 mg
ProtTryptophan (Trp, W) 0.01 g5.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.25 g
VitNiacin (née vitamin B3) 0.75 mg5.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 16 mg

Detailed micronutrients and daily requirement coverage per 100g

Explanations of nutrient tables in general

The majority of the nutritional information comes from the USDA (US Department of Agriculture). This means that the information for natural products is often incomplete or only given within broader categories, whereas in most cases products made from these have more complete information displayed.

If we take flaxseed, for example, the important essential amino acid ALA (omega-3) is only included in an overarching category whereas for flaxseed oil ALA is listed specifically. In time, we will be able to change this, but it will require a lot of work. An “i” appears behind ingredients that have been adjusted and an explanation appears when you hover over this symbol.

For Erb Muesli, the original calculations resulted in 48 % of the daily requirement of ALA — but with the correction, we see that the muesli actually covers >100 % of the necessary recommendation for the omega-3 fatty acid ALA. Our goal is to eventually be able to compare the nutritional value of our recipes with those that are used in conventional western lifestyles.

Essential fatty acids per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Alpha-Linolenic acid; ALA; 18:3 omega-3 0.03 g2.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the CH-EDI-Verordnung: 2.0 g
Linoleic acid; LA; 18:2 omega-6 0.12 g1.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the CH-EDI-Verordnung: 10 g

Essential amino acids per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Tryptophan (Trp, W) 0.01 g5.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.25 g
Valine (Val, V) 0.07 g5.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.6 g
Threonine (Thr, T) 0.04 g4.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.93 g
Isoleucine (Ile, I) 0.05 g4.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.2 g
Leucine (Leu, L) 0.07 g3.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 2.4 g
Lysine (Lys, K) 0.06 g3.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.9 g
Phenylalanine (Phe, F) 0.04 g3.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.6 g
Methionine (Met, M) 0.01 g1.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.93 g

Vitamins per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) 0.16 mg11.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.4 mg
Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) 5.0 mg6.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 80 mg
Folate, as the active form of folic acid (née vitamin B9 and 11 µg6.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 200 µg
Niacin (née vitamin B3) 0.75 mg5.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 16 mg
Pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) 0.20 mg3.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 6.0 mg
Thiamine (vitamin B1) 0.02 mg2.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.1 mg
Riboflavin (vitamin B2) 0.03 mg2.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.4 mg
Vitamin E, as a-TEs 0.26 mg2.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 12 mg
Vitamin A, as RAE 0 µg< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 µg
Vitamin D 0 µg< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 5.0 µg
Vitamin K 0.10 µg< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 75 µg
Biotin (ex vitamin B7, H) 0 µg< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 50 µg

Essential macroelements (macronutrients) per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Potassium, K 415 mg21.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2'000 mg
Magnesium, Mg 43 mg11.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 375 mg
Phosphorus, P 34 mg5.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 700 mg
Calcium, Ca 16 mg2.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 mg
Sodium, Na 13 mg2.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 mg

Essential trace elements (micronutrients) per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Copper, Cu 0.23 mg23.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.0 mg
Manganese, Mn 0.23 mg11.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2.0 mg
Iron, Fe 0.60 mg4.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 14 mg
Zinc, Zn 0.34 mg3.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 10 mg
Iod, I (Jod, J) 5.0 µg3.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 150 µg
Selenium, Se 0.70 µg1.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 55 µg
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