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Potato

Potatoes are an important basic staple with a high starch content. They should be eaten raw only in small amounts because of the solanine in the skin.
We have provided the missing values for the nutritional information from the USDA database for this ingredient.
79%
Water
 89
Macronutrient carbohydrates 89.1%
/10
Macronutrient proteins 10.44%
/00
Macronutrient fats 0.46%
 

The three ratios show the percentage by weight of macronutrients (carbohydrates / proteins / fats) of the dry matter (excl. water).

Ω-6 (LA, <0.1g)
Omega-6 fatty acid such as linoleic acid (LA)
 : Ω-3 (ALA, <0.1g)
Omega-3 fatty acid such as alpha-linolenic acid (ALA)
 = 0:0

Omega-6 ratio to omega-3 fatty acids should not exceed a total of 5:1. Link to explanation.

Values are too small to be relevant.

Originally from South America, the potato is one of the most important basic foods. Most vitamins are contained in the skin. It is not safe to eat potatoes raw, except in small amounts, since they contain the toxic alkaloid solanine. Green spots on the peel indicate areas of high concentration and should be cut out. Potatoes contain a varying amount of starch and certain varieties therefore work better for certain dishes.

General information:

From Wikipedia: “The potato is a starchy, tuberous crop from the perennial nightshade Solanum tuberosum. The word "potato" may refer either to the plant itself or to the edible tuber. In the Andes, where the species is indigenous, there are some other closely related cultivated potato species. Potatoes were introduced outside the Andes region approximately four centuries ago,and have since become an integral part of much of the world's food supply. It is the world's fourth-largest food crop, following maize, wheat, and rice.The green leaves and green skins of tubers exposed to the light are toxic.”

Role in world food supply:

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations reports that the world production of potatoes in 2013 was about 368 million tonnes. Just over two thirds of the global production is eaten directly by humans with the rest being fed to animals or used to produce starch. This means that the annual diet of an average global citizen in the first decade of the 21st century included about 33 kg (or 73 lb) of potato. However, the local importance of potato is extremely variable and rapidly changing. It remains an essential crop in Europe (especially eastern and central Europe), where per capita production is still the highest in the world, but the most rapid expansion over the past few decades has occurred in southern and eastern Asia. ...

In 2008, several international organizations highlighted the potato's role in world food production, in the face of developing economic problems. They cited its potential derived from its status as a cheap and plentiful crop that grows in a wide variety of climates and locales.

Nutrition:

The potato contains vitamins and minerals, as well as an assortment of phytochemicals, such as carotenoids and natural phenols. Chlorogenic acid constitutes up to 90% of the potato tuber natural phenols. Others found in potatoes are 4-O-caffeoylquinic acid (crypto-chlorogenic acid), 5-O-caffeoylquinic (neo-chlorogenic acid), 3,4-dicaffeoylquinic and 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acids. A medium-size 150 g (5.3 oz) potato with the skin provides 27 mg of vitamin C (45% of the Daily Value (DV)), 620 mg of potassium (18% of DV), 0.2 mg vitamin B6 (10% of DV) and trace amounts of thiamin, riboflavin, folate, niacin, magnesium, phosphorus, iron, and zinc.

The potato is best known for its carbohydrate content (approximately 26 grams in a medium potato). The predominant form of this carbohydrate is starch. A small but significant portion of this starch is resistant to digestion by enzymes in the stomach and small intestine, and so reaches the large intestine essentially intact. This resistant starch is considered to have similar physiological effects and health benefits as fiber: It provides bulk, offers protection against colon cancer, improves glucose tolerance and "insulinsensitivity", lowers plasma cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, increases satiety, and possibly even reduces fat storage. The amount of resistant starch in potatoes depends much on preparation methods. Cooking and then cooling potatoes significantly increases resistant starch. For example, cooked potato starch contains about 7% resistant starch, which increases to about 13% upon cooling. The storage and cooking method used can significantly affect the nutrient availability of the potato. Potatoes are often broadly classified as high on the glycemic index (GI) and so are often excluded from the diets of individuals trying to follow a low-GI diet.

Culinary uses:

Potatoes are prepared in many ways: skin-on or peeled, whole or cut up, with seasonings or without. The only requirement involves cooking to swell the starch granules. Most potato dishes are served hot, but some are first cooked, then served cold, notably potato salad and potato chips/crisps.

Common dishes are: mashed potatoes, which are first boiled (usually peeled), and then mashed with milk or yogurt and butter; whole baked potatoes; boiled or steamed potatoes; French-fried potatoes or chips; cut into cubes and roasted; scalloped, diced, or sliced and fried (home fries); grated into small thin strips and fried (hash browns); grated and formed into dumplings, Rösti or potato pancakes. ... Potato chunks also commonly appear as a stew ingredient.”

Other Uses:

  • Potatoes are used to brew alcoholic beverages such as vodka, potcheen, or akvavit.
  • They are also used as food for domestic animals.
  • Potato starch is used in the food industry as, for example, thickeners and binders of soups and sauces, in the textile industry, as adhesives, and for the manufacturing of papers and boards.
  • Maine companies are exploring the possibilities of using waste potatoes to obtain polylactic acid for use in plastic products; other research projects seek ways to use the starch as a base for biodegradable packaging.
  • Potato skins, along with honey, are a folk remedy for burns in India. Burn centers in India have experimented with the use of the thin outer skin layer to protect burns while healing.
  • Potatoes (mainly Russets) are commonly used in plant research. The consistent parenchyma tissue, the clonal nature of the plant and the low metabolic activity provide a very nice "model tissue" for experimentation. Wound-response studies are often done on potato tuber tissue, as are electron transport experiments. In this respect, potato tuber tissue is similar to Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans and Escherichia coli: they are all "standard" research organisms.

Storage:

“Storage facilities need to be carefully designed to keep the potatoes alive and slow the natural process of decomposition, which involves the breakdown of starch. It is crucial that the storage area is dark, well ventilated and for long-term storage maintained at temperatures near 4 °C (39 °F). For short-term storage before cooking, temperatures of about 7 to 10 °C (45 to 50 °F) are preferred.”

Nutrient tables

The complete nutritional information, coverage of the daily requirement and comparison values with other ingredients can be found in the following nutrient tables.

Nutritional Information
per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Energy77 kcal
322 kJ
3.8%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 2000kcal
Fat/Lipids0.09 g0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 70g
Saturated Fats0.02 g0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 20g
Carbohydrates (inc.dietary fiber)17 g6.5%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 270g
Sugars0.82 g0.9%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 90g
Fiber2.1 g8.4%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 25g
Protein/Albumin2.0 g4.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 50g
Cooking Salt (Na:6.0 mg)15 mg0.6%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 2.4g
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA.
Fat/Lipids
Carbohydrates
Protein/Albumin
Cooking Salt

Essential micronutrients with the highest proportions per 100g 2000 kcal
VitVitamin C (ascorbic acid) 20 mg25.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 80 mg
ElemPotassium, K 425 mg21.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2'000 mg
VitVitamin B6 (pyridoxine) 0.30 mg21.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.4 mg
MinCopper, Cu 0.11 mg11.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.0 mg
ProtTryptophan (Trp, W) 0.02 g8.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.25 g
VitFolate, as the active form of folic acid (née vitamin B9 and 15 µg8.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 200 µg
ElemPhosphorus, P 57 mg8.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 700 mg
MinManganese, Mn 0.15 mg8.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2.0 mg
ProtThreonine (Thr, T) 0.07 g7.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.93 g
VitNiacin (née vitamin B3) 1.1 mg7.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 16 mg

Detailed micronutrients and daily requirement coverage per 100g

Explanations of nutrient tables in general

The majority of the nutritional information comes from the USDA (US Department of Agriculture). This means that the information for natural products is often incomplete or only given within broader categories, whereas in most cases products made from these have more complete information displayed.

If we take flaxseed, for example, the important essential amino acid ALA (omega-3) is only included in an overarching category whereas for flaxseed oil ALA is listed specifically. In time, we will be able to change this, but it will require a lot of work. An “i” appears behind ingredients that have been adjusted and an explanation appears when you hover over this symbol.

For Erb Muesli, the original calculations resulted in 48 % of the daily requirement of ALA — but with the correction, we see that the muesli actually covers >100 % of the necessary recommendation for the omega-3 fatty acid ALA. Our goal is to eventually be able to compare the nutritional value of our recipes with those that are used in conventional western lifestyles.

Essential fatty acids per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Alpha-Linolenic acid; ALA; 18:3 omega-3 0.01 g1.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the CH-EDI-Verordnung: 2.0 g
Linoleic acid; LA; 18:2 omega-6 0.03 g< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the CH-EDI-Verordnung: 10 g

Essential amino acids per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Tryptophan (Trp, W) 0.02 g8.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.25 g
Threonine (Thr, T) 0.07 g7.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.93 g
Lysine (Lys, K) 0.11 g6.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.9 g
Valine (Val, V) 0.10 g6.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.6 g
Isoleucine (Ile, I) 0.07 g5.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.2 g
Phenylalanine (Phe, F) 0.08 g5.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.6 g
Leucine (Leu, L) 0.10 g4.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 2.4 g
Methionine (Met, M) 0.03 g3.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.93 g

Vitamins per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) 20 mg25.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 80 mg
Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) 0.30 mg21.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.4 mg
Folate, as the active form of folic acid (née vitamin B9 and 15 µg8.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 200 µg
Thiamine (vitamin B1) 0.08 mg7.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.1 mg
Niacin (née vitamin B3) 1.1 mg7.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 16 mg
Pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) 0.30 mg5.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 6.0 mg
Vitamin K 2.0 µg3.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 75 µg
Riboflavin (vitamin B2) 0.03 mg2.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.4 mg
Biotin (ex vitamin B7, H) 0.40 µg1.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 50 µg
Vitamin A, as RAE 0 µg< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 µg
Vitamin D 0 µg< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 5.0 µg
Vitamin E, as a-TEs 0.01 mg< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 12 mg

Essential macroelements (macronutrients) per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Potassium, K 425 mg21.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2'000 mg
Phosphorus, P 57 mg8.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 700 mg
Magnesium, Mg 23 mg6.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 375 mg
Calcium, Ca 12 mg2.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 mg
Sodium, Na 6.0 mg1.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 mg

Essential trace elements (micronutrients) per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Copper, Cu 0.11 mg11.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.0 mg
Manganese, Mn 0.15 mg8.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2.0 mg
Iron, Fe 0.81 mg6.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 14 mg
Zinc, Zn 0.30 mg3.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 10 mg
Iod, I (Jod, J) 3.4 µg2.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 150 µg
Selenium, Se 0.40 µg1.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 55 µg
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