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The best perspective for your health

The best perspective for your health

The best perspective for your health

Okara and Radish Stir-Fry with White Cabbage

You can use okara, a by-product of the soy milk production, to conjure up this stir-fry, a dish that goes well with a piece or two of fresh, crunchy bread.
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vegan

30min medium  
  Water 86.0%  69/15/16  LA 35:1 ALA


Ingredients (for servings, )

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For the okara and radish stir-fry
1 Onion (3.9 oz)
2 Carrots, raw (4.3 oz)
1 bunchRadish (2.5 oz)
2 ½ cupsOkara, soy pulp, tofu dregs (11 oz)
1 tbspSunflower oil (0.48 oz)
1 cup, choppedCabbage (3.1 oz)
1 cupDiced tomatoes, canned (8.5 oz)
Seasoning and garnish
1 dashSalt (0.01 oz)
1 tsp, groundDried oregano (0.06 oz)

Equipment

  • skillet (frying pan)
  • stove

Type of preparation

  • cook
  • fry
  • chop or grind
  • season to taste
  • sauté
  • remove the skin

Preparation

  1. For the okara and radish stir-fry
    Peel and chop the onion, chop the carrots and radishes, and then set to the side.

  2. Fry the okara in hot oil. Then add the vegetables and diced tomatoes and continue to cook until the vegetables are ready.

  3. The original recipe calls for tomato sauce, which the author prepares using fresh tomatoes, salt and, herbs of her choice (recipe on p. 26 of the cookbook “Vegan regional seasonal”). Alternatively, you can also use a ready-to-eat organic tomato sauce or even canned tomatoes. But if you have fresh tomatoes available, these are preferable.

  4. Seasoning and garnish
    At the end of the cooking process, season the Okara and Radish Stir-Fry with salt and sprinkle with herbs.

  5. At this point, Lisa Pfleger uses half a teaspoon of salt. Since the salt needed varies according to taste, we have deliberately listed just a pinch. You can add more if needed.

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Notes about recipe

You can use okara, a by-product of the soy milk production, to conjure up this stir-fry, a dish that goes well with a piece or two of fresh, crunchy bread.

Unit of measurement (cups): The “cups” used in this recipe refer to a cup with a volume of 250 ml.

Okara: Okara is the pulp of soybeans, a by-product of soy milk production with a neutral taste. You can find a recipe to make okara yourself on page 26 of the cookbook “Vegan regional saisonal.” In cooking, it is used as an ingredient for pastry dough, soups, and casseroles, and is also added to muesli. Since okara is a good binder, it can be used as an egg substitute. Okara is rich in starch, protein, fiber, and iron. In an air-tight container, it can be stored in the refrigerator for about a week — and dried in crumb form for several weeks.

Tips

Making okara yourself: Under the ingredient “Okara,” you will find directions on how to make okara yourself in five steps. If you want to use homemade okara in this recipe, you should soak the soybeans in water overnight before starting.

Possible combinations: This okara and radish stir-fry goes well with rice or crunchy bread.

Alternate preparation

Tomato sauce: You can prepare tomato sauce easily by cooking tomatoes and then chopping or pureeing them. There is a recipe for homemade tomato sauce in the cookbook "Vegan regional seasonal" on page 26. Alternatively you can use our recipe: Tomato Sauce with Tamarind. If you are in a hurry or don’t have fresh tomatoes on hand, you can also use store-bought organic tomato sauce or diced tomatoes in a can.

Seasoning with herbs: Along with oregano, you can also use other Mediterranean herbs such as basil, rosemary, or thyme. Depending on which type of tomato sauce you use, you may not have to use any additional seasoning at all.

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