Foundation Diet and Health

The best perspective for your health

The best perspective for your health

The best perspective for your health

The best perspective for your health

Beefsteak tomato

The large, flat beefsteak tomato is one of the most commonly cultivated varieties. Compared to smaller tomatoes, they are less juicy and have a thicker skin.
Water 93.9%  77/19/04  LA : ALA
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Beefsteak tomatoes usually have a flatter shape than other varieties and can vary widely in shape, color, size, and taste. They have thick skin and relatively few seeds and more chambers, which makes them firmer. In contrast to smaller tomato varieties, beefsteak tomatoes are usually preferred for cooking on account of their size. Although they usually require a longer amount of time to mature than, for example, cherry tomatoes, they have an intense, juicy, and aromatic flavor.

General information:

From Wikipedia: “A beef tomato (British English) or beefsteak tomato (American English) is any of the largest varieties of cultivated tomatoes, some weighing 450 grams (0.99 lb) or more. Most are pink or red with numerous small seed compartments (locules) distributed throughout the fruit, sometimes displaying pronounced ribbing similar to ancient pre-Columbian tomato cultivars. While popular among home growers for sandwich making and other applications requiring a large tomato to be eaten raw, beefsteaks are not grown commercially as often as other types, since they are not considered as suitable for mechanization as smaller slicing tomatoes.

General information about tomatoes:

From “en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomato”: The tomato is the edible, often red, fruit of the plant Solanum lycopersicum, commonly known as a tomato plant. The plant belongs to the nightshade family, which is called Solanaceae.

The species originated in Central and South America. The Nahuatl (Aztec language) word tomatl gave rise to the Spanish word "tomate", from which the English word tomato originates.

Its use as a food originated in Mexico, and spread throughout the world following the Spanish colonization of the Americas. Tomato is consumed in diverse ways, including raw, as an ingredient in many dishes, sauces, salads, and drinks. While tomatoes are botanically berry-type fruits, they are considered culinary vegetables, being ingredients of savory meals.

Numerous varieties of tomato are widely grown in temperate climates across the world, with greenhouses allowing its production throughout the year and in cooler areas. The plants typically grow to 1–3 meters (3–10 ft) in height and have a weak stem that often sprawls over the ground and vines over other plants. It is a perennial in its native habitat, and grown as an annual in temperate climates. An average common tomato weighs approximately 100 grams (4 oz).

Potential health effects:

From “en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomato”: There is no conclusive evidence that the lycopene in tomatoes or in supplements affects the onset of cardiovascular diseases or cancer.

In the United States, supposed health benefits of consuming tomatoes, tomato products or lycopene to affect cancer cannot be mentioned on packaged food products without a qualified health claim statement. In a scientific review of potential claims for lycopene favorably affecting DNA, skin exposed to ultraviolet radiation, heart function and vision, the European Food Safety Authority concluded there was insufficient evidence for lycopene having any of these effects.

Plant toxicity:

From “en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomato”: Leaves, stems, and green unripe fruit of the tomato plant contain small amounts of the toxic alkaloid tomatine. They also contain small amounts of solanine, a toxic alkaloid found in potato leaves and other plants in the nightshade family. Use of tomato leaves in herbal tea has been responsible for at least one death. However, levels of tomatine in foliage and green fruit are generally too small to be dangerous unless large amounts are consumed, for example, as greens. Small amounts of tomato foliage are sometimes used for flavoring without ill effect, and the green fruit is sometimes used for cooking, particularly as fried green tomatoes. Compared to potatoes, the amount of solanine in green or ripe tomatoes is low; however, even in the case of potatoes while solanine poisoning resulting from dosages several times normal human consumption has been demonstrated, actual cases of poisoning resulting from excessive consumption of potatoes that have high concentration of solanine are rare.

Tomato plants can be toxic to dogs if they eat large amounts of the fruit, or chew plant material.

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