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Ground paprika

The spiciness and flavor of ground paprika depends primarily on the type of peppers and the parts of the plant used to produce it.
11%
Water
 67
Macronutrient carbohydrates 66.64%
/17
Macronutrient proteins 17.45%
/16
Macronutrient fats 15.91%
 

The three ratios show the percentage by weight of macronutrients (carbohydrates / proteins / fats) of the dry matter (excl. water).

Ω-6 (LA, 7.3g)
Omega-6 fatty acid such as linoleic acid (LA)
 : Ω-3 (ALA, 0.5g)
Omega-3 fatty acid such as alpha-linolenic acid (ALA)
 = 16:1

Omega-6 ratio to omega-3 fatty acids should not exceed a total of 5:1. Link to explanation.

Here, essential linolenic acid (LA) 7.31 g to essential alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) 0.45 g = 16:1.
Ratio Total omega-6 = 7.31 g to omega-3 fatty acids Total = 0.45 g = 16:1.
On average, we need about 2 g of LA and ALA per day from which a healthy body also produces EPA and DHA, etc.

Ground paprika, which has been grown extensively since the eighteenth century, has long since ceased to be a spice that is found only in Hungarian cuisine. By varying the type of peppers and the parts of the plant that are used to produce it, the flavor and degree of spiciness can be strongly influenced. Ground paprika has a wide range of culinary uses.

General information:

From Wikipedia: “Paprika (US English more commonly Listeni/pəˈpriːkə/, British English more commonly Listeni/ˈpæprɪkə/) is a ground spice made from red air-dried fruits of the larger and sweeter varieties of the plant Capsicum annuum, called bell pepper or sweet pepper, sometimes with the addition of more pungent varieties, called chili peppers, and cayenne pepper. In many languages, but not English, the word paprika also refers to the plant and the fruit from which the spice is made.

Although paprika is often associated with Hungarian cuisine, the peppers from which it is made are native to the New World and were later introduced to the Old World. Originating in central Mexico, paprika was brought to Spain in the 16th century. The seasoning is also used to add color to many types of dishes. ...

Paprika can range from mild to hot – the flavor also varies from country to country – but almost all plants grown produce the sweet variety. Sweet paprika is mostly composed of the pericarp, with more than half of the seeds removed, whereas hot paprika contains some seeds, stalks, placentas, and calyces. The red, orange or yellow color of paprika is due to its content of carotenoids.”

Culinary uses:

Paprika is used as an ingredient in numerous dishes throughout the world. It is principally used to season and color rices, stews, and soups, such as goulash, and in the preparation of sausages, mixed with meats and other spices. In the United States, paprika is frequently sprinkled raw on foods as a garnish, but the flavor is more effectively pronounced by heating it in oil.

Hungarian paprika is often specified in recipes because it is unique. It is bright red and said to be sweeter than the same paprika grown in other soils and climates. In paprikash (paprika gravy: a combination of broth, paprika, and sour cream), Hungarian paprika is commonly used. In Moroccan cuisine, paprika (tahmira) is usually augmented by the addition of a small amount of olive oil blended into it.”

Carotenoids:

The red, orange or yellow color of paprika powder derives from its mix of carotenoids. Yellow-orange paprika colors derive primarily from α-carotene and β-carotene (provitamin A compounds), zeaxanthin, lutein and β-cryptoxanthin, whereas red colors derive from capsanthin and capsorubin.

Nutrition:

In a typical serving size of one teaspoon (2 grams), paprika supplies 6 calories and is rich in vitamin A (21% of the Daily Value), but provides no other nutrients in significant content.”

Production:

“Paprika is produced in various places including Hungary, Serbia, Spain, the Netherlands, China, and some regions of the United States. Hungary is a major source of commonly-used paprika. ...

The Hungarian varieties are more robust and considered superior. The Spanish varieties are sweeter and milder. Most tables in Hungary are set with salt and hot paprika (not black pepper) shakers. One particular variety, the 'rose', known for its sweet aroma and brilliant color, is prized above all others. Hungarian agricultural authorities fiercely guard their plants and seeds and twice as much acreage is devoted to peppers as any other crop.

Due to the favourable climate and geographical conditions, Hungarian paprika has a bright red colour and a distinctive rich flavour that allowed Hungary to become one of the leading paprika producers in the world ... Kalocsa and Szeged in the southern part of Hungary are the heart of paprika production in Hungary. These regions have the highest amount of sunny hours a year and paprika plants need lots of sunshine to get ripe and sweet.

Spanish paprika (pimentón) is available in three versions — mild (pimentón dulce), moderately spicy (pimentón agridulce), and very spicy (pimentón picante). Some Spanish paprika, like pimentón de la Vera, has a distinct smoky flavor and aroma as it is dried by smoking, typically using oak wood.

The Netherlands is a major production and distribution source of paprika as well, especially grown in greenhouses, while China is the world's biggest exporter of sweet paprika for use as a coloring agent as of 2016.”

Nutrient tables

The complete nutritional information, coverage of the daily requirement and comparison values with other ingredients can be found in the following nutrient tables.

Nutritional Information
per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Energy282 kcal
1'180 kJ
14.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 2000kcal
Fat/Lipids13 g18.4%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 70g
Saturated Fats2.1 g10.7%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 20g
Carbohydrates (inc.dietary fiber)54 g20.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 270g
Sugars10 g11.5%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 90g
Fiber35 g139.6%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 25g
Protein/Albumin14 g28.3%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 50g
Cooking Salt (Na:68.0 mg)173 mg7.2%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 2.4g
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA.
Fat/Lipids
Carbohydrates
Protein/Albumin
Cooking Salt

Essential micronutrients with the highest proportions per 100g 2000 kcal
VitVitamin A, as RAE 2'463 µg308.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 µg
VitVitamin E, as a-TEs 29 mg243.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 12 mg
VitVitamin B6 (pyridoxine) 2.1 mg153.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.4 mg
MinIron, Fe 21 mg151.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 14 mg
ElemPotassium, K 2'280 mg114.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2'000 mg
VitVitamin K 80 µg107.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 75 µg
VitRiboflavin (vitamin B2) 1.2 mg88.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.4 mg
MinManganese, Mn 1.6 mg80.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2.0 mg
FatLinoleic acid; LA; 18:2 omega-6 7.3 g73.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the CH-EDI-Verordnung: 10 g
MinCopper, Cu 0.71 mg71.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.0 mg

Detailed micronutrients and daily requirement coverage per 100g

Explanations of nutrient tables in general

The majority of the nutritional information comes from the USDA (US Department of Agriculture). This means that the information for natural products is often incomplete or only given within broader categories, whereas in most cases products made from these have more complete information displayed.

If we take flaxseed, for example, the important essential amino acid ALA (omega-3) is only included in an overarching category whereas for flaxseed oil ALA is listed specifically. In time, we will be able to change this, but it will require a lot of work. An “i” appears behind ingredients that have been adjusted and an explanation appears when you hover over this symbol.

For Erb Muesli, the original calculations resulted in 48 % of the daily requirement of ALA — but with the correction, we see that the muesli actually covers >100 % of the necessary recommendation for the omega-3 fatty acid ALA. Our goal is to eventually be able to compare the nutritional value of our recipes with those that are used in conventional western lifestyles.

Essential fatty acids per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Linoleic acid; LA; 18:2 omega-6 7.3 g73.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the CH-EDI-Verordnung: 10 g
Alpha-Linolenic acid; ALA; 18:3 omega-3 0.45 g23.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the CH-EDI-Verordnung: 2.0 g

Essential amino acids per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Threonine (Thr, T) 0.49 g53.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.93 g
Valine (Val, V) 0.75 g47.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.6 g
Isoleucine (Ile, I) 0.57 g46.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.2 g
Phenylalanine (Phe, F) 0.61 g39.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.6 g
Leucine (Leu, L) 0.92 g38.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 2.4 g
Lysine (Lys, K) 0.69 g37.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.9 g
Tryptophan (Trp, W) 0.07 g28.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.25 g
Methionine (Met, M) 0.20 g22.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.93 g

Vitamins per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Vitamin A, as RAE 2'463 µg308.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 µg
Vitamin E, as a-TEs 29 mg243.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 12 mg
Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) 2.1 mg153.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.4 mg
Vitamin K 80 µg107.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 75 µg
Riboflavin (vitamin B2) 1.2 mg88.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.4 mg
Niacin (née vitamin B3) 10 mg63.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 16 mg
Pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) 2.5 mg42.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 6.0 mg
Thiamine (vitamin B1) 0.33 mg30.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.1 mg
Folate, as the active form of folic acid (née vitamin B9 and 49 µg25.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 200 µg
Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) 0.90 mg1.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 80 mg
Vitamin D 0 µg< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 5.0 µg

Essential macroelements (macronutrients) per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Potassium, K 2'280 mg114.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2'000 mg
Magnesium, Mg 178 mg47.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 375 mg
Phosphorus, P 314 mg45.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 700 mg
Calcium, Ca 229 mg29.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 mg
Sodium, Na 68 mg9.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 mg

Essential trace elements (micronutrients) per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Iron, Fe 21 mg151.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 14 mg
Manganese, Mn 1.6 mg80.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2.0 mg
Copper, Cu 0.71 mg71.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.0 mg
Zinc, Zn 4.3 mg43.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 10 mg
Selenium, Se 6.3 µg11.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 55 µg
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