Foundation Diet and Health

The best perspective for your health

The best perspective for your health

The best perspective for your health

The best perspective for your health

Pear

Raw pears contain valuable vitamins, minerals, and trace elements. Pears are also used in cooked, preserved, or dried form.
Water 84.0%  97/02/01  LA : ALA
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Even though they are relatively low in calories, pears contain many trace elements and vitamins. Pears are consumed either fresh, preserved, as a juice, or dried. Since they ripen at room temperature, they should be stored in cooler places to slow down the ripening process.

General information:

From Wikipedia: “The pear is any of several tree and shrub species of genus Pyrus, in the family Rosaceae.It is also the name of the pomaceous fruit of the trees. Several species of pear are valued for their edible fruit, while others are cultivated as ornamental trees. ...

The pear is native to coastal and mildly temperate regions of the Old World, from western Europe and north Africa east right across Asia. It is a medium-sized tree, reaching 10–17 meters (33–56 ft) tall, often with a tall, narrow crown; a few species are shrubby.”

Nutritional information:

Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz): calories 57 kcal, fat 0.14 g, carbohydrates 15.23 , of which 9.75 g come from sugar, dietary fiber 3.1 g, and protein 0.36 g.

Culinary uses and ripeness:

“Pears are consumed fresh, canned, as juice, and dried. The juice can also be used in jellies and jams, usually in combination with other fruits, including berries. Fermented pear juice is called perry or pear cider and is made in a way that is similar to how cider is made from apples.

Pear Bureau Northwest offers tips on ripening and judging ripeness: Although the skin on Bartlett pears changes from green to yellow as they ripen, most varieties show little color change as they ripen. Because pears ripen from the inside out, the best way to judge ripeness is to "Check the Neck": apply gentle thumb pressure to the neck or stem end of the pear. If it yields to gentle pressure, then the pear is ripe, sweet, and juicy. If it is firm, leave the pear at room temperature and check the neck daily for ripeness.”

Cultivation:

“According to Pear Bureau Northwest, about 3000 known varieties of pears are grown worldwide. The pear is normally propagated by grafting a selected variety onto a rootstock, which may be of a pear variety or quince. Quince rootstocks produce smaller trees, which is often desirable in commercial orchards or domestic gardens. For new varieties the flowers can be cross-bred to preserve or combine desirable traits. The fruit of the pear is produced on spurs, which appear on shoots more than one year old.

Three species account for the vast majority of edible fruit production, the European pear Pyrus communis subsp. communis cultivated mainly in Europe and North America, the Chinese white pear (bai li) Pyrus ×bretschneideri, and the Nashi pear Pyrus pyrifolia (also known as Asian pear or apple pear), both grown mainly in eastern Asia.”

Harvest:

“Summer and autumn cultivars of Pyrus communis, being climacteric fruits, are gathered before they are fully ripe, while they are still green, but snap off when lifted. ...”

Storage:

“Pears may be stored at room temperature until ripe. Pears are ripe when the flesh around the stem gives to gentle pressure. Ripe pears are optimally stored refrigerated, uncovered in a single layer, where they have a shelf life of 2 to 3 days.”

Interesting facts:

“The word “pear” is probably from Germanic pera as a loanword of Vulgar Latin pira, the plural of pirum, akin to Greek apios (from Mycenaean ápisos), of Semitic origin ("pirâ"), meaning "fruit". The term "pyriform" is used to describe something pear-shaped.”

“Pear wood is one of the preferred materials in the manufacture of high-quality woodwind instruments and furniture, and was used for making the carved blocks for woodcuts. It is also used for wood carving, and as a firewood to produce aromatic smoke for smoking meat or tobacco. ... Pear wood is the favored wood for architect's rulers because it does not warp. It is similar to the wood of its relative, the apple tree (Malus domestica) and used for many of the same purposes.”

Ingredient with nutrient tables


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