Foundation Diet and Health

The best perspective for your health

The best perspective for your health

The best perspective for your health

The best perspective for your health

Spelt, uncooked

Spelt is closely related to wheat but contains different types of gluten. It does not contain omega-5 gliadin, the most potent wheat allergen.
Water 11.0%  81/17/03  LA : ALA
Comments Print
Click for nutrient tables

Spelt (Triticum aestivum subsp. spelta) is a species of grain and is closely related to wheat. Spelt, emmer, and einkorn wheat belong to the family of spelt crops.

Culinary uses:

According to Wikipedia, spelt flour is closely related to wheat and is often referred to as “proto-wheat.” Both wheat and spelt contain gluten. White spelt flour is mainly used for baking and in most recipes can be used as a substitute for wheat flour. Although spelt has a high protein content, doughs with spelt flour are usually more difficult to knead and shape. It is primarily the proteins gliadin and glutenin that determine how easy it will be to bake with spelt and wheat. As compared to wheat, spelt contains more gliadin, which makes the dough elastic, and less glutenin, which ensures that the dough holds together well. This is why spelt doughs are smooth and elastic but don’t hold their shape and crumble easily. Baked goods made using spelt become dry and hard after a short period.
Coarsely ground green spelt: Coarsely ground green spelt is made from unripened spelt and is related to wheat. It is harvested while still green, dried over a beechwood fire, and coarsely ground. Its nutritional profile is comparable to that of wheat except that it has a notably higher content of silicic acid.

Not only vegans and vegetarians should read this:
A Vegan Diet Can Be Unhealthy. Nutrition Mistakes.

Purchasing:

Both whole grain and white are available in stores. While all types of spelt flour are a good source of minerals, whole grain spelt flour has a higher nutrient content and is a healthier choice.

Storing:

Store spelt in tightly sealed plastic or glass containers in a cool, dry, and dark location. Whole spelt can be stored up to a year in the freezer or 6 months in the pantry. Spelt flour is best stored in the freezer and will last up to 6 months. If the grains or flour have a rancid smell when you open the container, discard and purchase fresh.

Nutritional information:

Spelt is an excellent source of protein, dietary fiber, several B vitamins, and numerous dietary minerals. Richest nutrient values include manganese (149% DV), phosphorus (57% DV) and niacin (43% DV). Spelt contains about 70% total carbohydrates, including 11% as dietary fiber, and is low in fat (see nutrient table).
Like wheat, spelt contains a significant amount of phytic acid, which can reduce the absorption of minerals. Soaking, sprouting, and fermenting can significantly reduce the phytic acid content of spelt. Be sure to discard the water used for soaking spelt to reduce the phytic acid content.

Health aspects:

The nutrient content of spelt is comparable to that of wheat except for salicic acid. Spelt flour contains significantly higher levels of this nutrient than wheat flour. 
Coarsely ground green spelt: Coarsely ground green spelt is made from unripened spelt and is related to wheat. It is harvested while still green, dried over a beechwood fire, and coarsely ground. Its nutritional profile is comparable to that of wheat except that it has a notably higher content of silicic acid.

Dangers / Intolerances:

Spelt contains gluten and is therefore unsuitable for people with gluten-related disorders, such as celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Some individuals with a wheat allergy may be able to tolerate spelt as it does not contain omega-5 gliadin, the most potent wheat allergen.

General information:

Spelt (Triticum spelta; Triticum dicoccum) is considered an ancient grain. It is a species of wheat cultivated since approximately 5000 BC, with evidence that spelt was an important staple in parts of Europe from the Bronze Age to medieval times.
Wikipedia: the most abundant and best-documented archaeological evidence of spelt is in Europe. Remains of spelt have been found in some later Neolithic sites (2500–1700 BC) in Central Europe. During the Bronze Age, spelt spread widely in central Europe. In the Iron Age (750–15 BC), spelt became a principal wheat species in southern Germany and Switzerland, and by 500 BC, it was in common use in southern Britain.
In the Middle Ages, spelt was cultivated in parts of Switzerland, Tyrol, Germany, northern France and the Netherlands. Spelt became a major crop in Europe in the 9th century CE, possibly because it is husked, unlike other grains, and therefore more adaptable to cold climates and is more suitable for storage.
1

It now survives as a relict crop in Central Europe and northern Spain and has also found a new market as an organic and natural food.
Spelt was introduced to the United States in the 1890s. In the 20th century, spelt was replaced by common wheat in almost all areas where it was still grown. The organic farming movement revived its popularity somewhat toward the end of the century and spelt is now a common wheat substitute for making artisanal bread, pasta, and cereals.

As with wheat, spelt contains gluten, which can cause people who suffer from celiac disease (gluten intolerance) to have health problems.

Literature / Sources:

  1. Wikipedia. Spelt  [Internet]. Version dated 10.29.2018

Ingredient with nutrient tables


Commenting (as guest) or log in
Comments Print