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Dry yeast

Dry yeast is a baking yeast commonly used as a leavening agent for breads and baked goods, both at home and the bakery. Yeast is made inactive by dehydration.
5%
Water
 46
Macronutrient carbohydrates 46.17%
/45
Macronutrient proteins 45.3%
/09
Macronutrient fats 8.52%
 

The three ratios show the percentage by weight of macronutrients (carbohydrates / proteins / fats) of the dry matter (excl. water).

Ω-6 (LA, <0.1g)
Omega-6 fatty acid such as linoleic acid (LA)
 : Ω-3 (ALA, <0.1g)
Omega-3 fatty acid such as alpha-linolenic acid (ALA)
 = 0:0

Omega-6 ratio to omega-3 fatty acids should not exceed a total of 5:1. Link to explanation.

Values are too small to be relevant.

Dry yeast is related to brewer’s yeast, which is used to ferment alcoholic liquids, such as beer. In contrast to fresh yeast, it doesn’t need to be hydrated before it is added to a dough mixture. Dry yeast is produced by extracting a large percentage of water so that the yeast cells are inactivated, but not killed.

Culinary uses:

In baking: S. cerevisiae is used in baking; the carbon dioxide generated by the fermentation s used as a leavening agent in bread and other baked goods. Historically, this use was closely linked to the brewing industry's use of yeast, as bakers took or bought the barm or yeast-filled foam from brewing ale from the brewers (producing the barm cake); today, brewing and baking yeast strains are somewhat different.1

You generally have the choice between fresh yeast (cubes), dry yeast (shelf life: about 1 year), and liquid yeast. Inactivated baker’s yeast in yeast doughs is usually used at a rate of about 3 to 6 % of the flour weight. Doughs with a high fat content can contain up to 8 % yeast since the low water content causes slower yeast activity. A standard 7 g package of dry yeast sold in the supermarket is roughly equivalent to half of a 42.5 g cube of fresh yeast.

In brewing: Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used in brewing beer, when it is sometimes called a top-fermenting or top-cropping yeast. It is so called because during the fermentation process its hydrophobic surface causes the flocs to adhere to CO2 and rise to the top of the fermentation vessel. Top-fermenting yeasts are fermented at higher temperatures than the lager yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus, and the resulting beers have a different flavor than the same beverage fermented with a lager yeast. "Fruity esters" may be formed if the yeast undergoes temperatures near 21 °C (70 °F), or if the fermentation temperature of the beverage fluctuates during the process. Lager yeast normally ferments at a temperature of approximately 5 °C (41 °F), where Saccharomyces cerevisiae becomes dormant.1

Not only vegans and vegetarians should read this:
A Vegan Diet Can Be Unhealthy. Nutrition Mistakes.
.

Storage:

At room temperature, yeast can be stored for quite a long time. However, you should not use the yeast if the expiration date has passed since the ability of the yeast cells to reactivate decreases with time.

General information:

Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a species of yeast. It has been instrumental to winemaking, baking, and brewing since ancient times. It is believed to have been originally isolated from the skin of grapes (one can see the yeast as a component of the thin white film on the skins of some dark-colored fruits such as plums; it exists among the waxes of the cuticle). It is one of the most intensively studied eukaryotic model organisms in molecular and cell biology, much like Escherichia coli as the model bacterium. It is the microorganism behind the most common type of fermentation. S. cerevisiae cells are round to ovoid, 5–10 μm in diameter. It reproduces by a division process known as budding.1

Production:

Baker’s yeast is produced industrially using pure yeast cultures that multiply until the desired quantity of baker’s yeast is achieved. If you start with about 8 kg of material and let it double around 33 times, almost ten billion times the original amount is produced in about 11 days.

Pure yeast cultures are obtained from selecting and cultivating sourdough cultures or brewer’s yeast. Baker’s yeast ferments more quickly than the wild yeast in sourdough, but in contrast, it doesn’t tolerate acids, salts, and fats as well. Dry yeast is produced by extracting a large amount of water from the mash which inactivates the yeast cells, but doesn’t kill them.

The emulsifier citrem (citric acid esters of fatty acids) is usually added in order to prevent the yeast cells from drying out to much. This way, the cells are only inactivated and don’t die.

Interesting facts:

Many proteins important in human biology were first discovered by studying their homologs in yeast; these proteins include cell cycle proteins, signaling proteins, and protein-processing enzymes. S. cerevisiae is currently the only yeast cell known to have Berkeley bodies present, which are involved in particular secretory pathways. Antibodies against S. cerevisiae are found in 60–70% of patients with Crohn's disease and 10–15% of patients with ulcerative colitis (and 8% of healthy controls).1

Literature / Sources:

  1. Wikipedia. Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Nutrient tables

The complete nutritional information, coverage of the daily requirement and comparison values with other ingredients can be found in the following nutrient tables.

Nutritional Information
per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Energy325 kcal
1'360 kJ
16.2%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 2000kcal
Fat/Lipids7.6 g10.9%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 70g
Saturated Fats1.0 g5.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 20g
Carbohydrates (inc.dietary fiber)41 g15.3%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 270g
Sugars0 g0.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 90g
Fiber27 g107.6%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 25g
Protein/Albumin40 g80.9%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 50g
Cooking Salt (Na:51.0 mg)130 mg5.4%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 2.4g
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA.
Fat/Lipids
Carbohydrates
Protein/Albumin
Cooking Salt

Essential micronutrients with the highest proportions per 100g 2000 kcal
VitFolate, as the active form of folic acid (née vitamin B9 and 2'340 µg1'170.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 200 µg
VitThiamine (vitamin B1) 11 mg999.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.1 mg
VitRiboflavin (vitamin B2) 4.0 mg286.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.4 mg
VitNiacin (née vitamin B3) 40 mg251.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 16 mg
VitPantothenic acid (vitamin B5) 14 mg225.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 6.0 mg
ProtTryptophan (Trp, W) 0.54 g218.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.25 g
ProtThreonine (Thr, T) 2.0 g214.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.93 g
ProtLysine (Lys, K) 3.3 g176.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.9 g
ProtIsoleucine (Ile, I) 1.9 g152.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.2 g
ProtValine (Val, V) 2.3 g143.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.6 g

Detailed micronutrients and daily requirement coverage per 100g

Explanations of nutrient tables in general

The majority of the nutritional information comes from the USDA (US Department of Agriculture). This means that the information for natural products is often incomplete or only given within broader categories, whereas in most cases products made from these have more complete information displayed.

If we take flaxseed, for example, the important essential amino acid ALA (omega-3) is only included in an overarching category whereas for flaxseed oil ALA is listed specifically. In time, we will be able to change this, but it will require a lot of work. An “i” appears behind ingredients that have been adjusted and an explanation appears when you hover over this symbol.

For Erb Muesli, the original calculations resulted in 48 % of the daily requirement of ALA — but with the correction, we see that the muesli actually covers >100 % of the necessary recommendation for the omega-3 fatty acid ALA. Our goal is to eventually be able to compare the nutritional value of our recipes with those that are used in conventional western lifestyles.

Essential fatty acids per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Alpha-Linolenic acid; ALA; 18:3 omega-3 0 g< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the CH-EDI-Verordnung: 2.0 g
Linoleic acid; LA; 18:2 omega-6 0.02 g< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the CH-EDI-Verordnung: 10 g

Essential amino acids per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Tryptophan (Trp, W) 0.54 g218.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.25 g
Threonine (Thr, T) 2.0 g214.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.93 g
Lysine (Lys, K) 3.3 g176.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.9 g
Isoleucine (Ile, I) 1.9 g152.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.2 g
Valine (Val, V) 2.3 g143.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.6 g
Leucine (Leu, L) 2.9 g121.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 2.4 g
Phenylalanine (Phe, F) 1.8 g113.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.6 g
Methionine (Met, M) 0.59 g63.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.93 g

Vitamins per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Folate, as the active form of folic acid (née vitamin B9 and 2'340 µg1'170.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 200 µg
Thiamine (vitamin B1) 11 mg999.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.1 mg
Riboflavin (vitamin B2) 4.0 mg286.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.4 mg
Niacin (née vitamin B3) 40 mg251.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 16 mg
Pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) 14 mg225.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 6.0 mg
Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) 1.5 mg107.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.4 mg
Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin) 0.07 µg3.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2.5 µg
Vitamin K 0.40 µg1.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 75 µg
Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) 0.30 mg< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 80 mg
Vitamin A, as RAE 0 µg< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 µg
Vitamin D 0 µg< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 5.0 µg

Essential macroelements (macronutrients) per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Phosphorus, P 637 mg91.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 700 mg
Potassium, K 955 mg48.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2'000 mg
Magnesium, Mg 54 mg14.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 375 mg
Sodium, Na 51 mg6.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 mg
Calcium, Ca 30 mg4.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 mg

Essential trace elements (micronutrients) per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Zinc, Zn 7.9 mg79.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 10 mg
Copper, Cu 0.44 mg44.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.0 mg
Iron, Fe 2.2 mg16.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 14 mg
Manganese, Mn 0.31 mg16.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2.0 mg
Selenium, Se 7.9 µg14.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 55 µg
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