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White beans, dry

White beans are rich in nutrients and can be used in a wide variety of dishes, from vegetable sides and purées to soups, salads, and stews.
11%
Water
 71
Macronutrient carbohydrates 71.34%
/28
Macronutrient proteins 27.65%
/01
Macronutrient fats 1.01%
 

The three ratios show the percentage by weight of macronutrients (carbohydrates / proteins / fats) of the dry matter (excl. water).

Ω-6 (LA, 0.2g)
Omega-6 fatty acid such as linoleic acid (LA)
 : Ω-3 (ALA, 0.2g)
Omega-3 fatty acid such as alpha-linolenic acid (ALA)
 = 1:1

Omega-6 ratio to omega-3 fatty acids should not exceed a total of 5:1. Link to explanation.

Here, essential linolenic acid (LA) 0.2 g to essential alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) 0.17 g = 1.19:1.
Ratio Total omega-6 = 0.2 g to omega-3 fatty acids Total = 0.17 g = 1.19:1.
On average, we need about 2 g of LA and ALA per day from which a healthy body also produces EPA and DHA, etc.

General information on white beans:

From Wikipedia: “Navy beans or haricot beans are particularly popular in the United Kingdom and the United States. Other white beans include cannellini, a popular variety in central and southern Italy that is related to the kidney bean. White beans are the most abundant plant-based source of phosphatidylserine known.”

General information on beans:

“Phaseolus vulgaris, the common bean (also known as the string bean, field bean, flageolet bean, French bean, garden bean, green bean, haricot bean, pop bean, snap bean, or snap), is a herbaceous annual plant grown worldwide for its edible dry seed (known as just "beans") or unripe fruit (green beans). Raw or undercooked beans contain the toxin phytohaemagglutinin. Its leaf is also occasionally used as a vegetable and the straw as fodder. Its botanical classification, along with other Phaseolus species, is as a member of the legume family Fabaceae, most of whose members acquire the nitrogen they require through an association with rhizobia, a species of nitrogen-fixing bacteria.

The common bean is a highly variable species that has a long history of cultivation. All wild members of the species have a climbing habit, but many cultivars are classified as "bush beans" or "pole beans", depending on their style of "growing". These include the kidney bean, the navy bean, the pinto bean, and the wax bean. The other major types of commercially grown bean are the runner bean (Phaseolus coccineus) and the broad bean (Vicia faba).

Beans are grown in every continent except Antarctica. Brazil and India are the largest producers of dry beans, while China produces, by far, the largest quantity of green beans. Worldwide, 23 million tonnes of dry common beans and 17.1 million tonnes of green beans were grown in 2010.”

Nutritional information and preparations:

“Similar to other beans, the common bean is high in starch, protein, and dietary fiber, and is an excellent source of iron, potassium, selenium, molybdenum, thiamine, vitamin B6, and folate.
Dry beans will keep indefinitely if stored in a cool, dry place, but as time passes, their nutritive value and flavor degrade and cooking times lengthen. Dried beans are almost always cooked by boiling, often after being soaked in water for several hours. While the soaking is not strictly necessary, it shortens cooking time and results in more evenly textured beans. In addition, soaking beans removes 5 to 10% of the gas-producing sugars that can cause flatulence for some people. ...

Before cooking, the soaking water is drained off and discarded. Dry common beans take longer to cook than most pulses: cooking times vary from one to four hours, but are substantially reduced with pressure cooking. ...

Dry beans may also be bought cooked and canned as refried beans, or whole with water, salt, and sometimes sugar.”

Production:

“In 2010, total world production of dry beans was 23 million metric tons, harvested from over 30 million hectares. World production of green beans in 2010 was 17.7 million tons, harvested from 15.1 million hectares.”

Toxicity:

The toxic compound phytohaemagglutinin, a lectin, is present in many common bean varieties, but is especially concentrated in red kidney beans. White kidney beans contain about a third as much toxin as the red variety; broad beans (Vicia faba) contain 5 to 10% as much as red kidney beans.

Phytohaemagglutinin can be deactivated by cooking beans for ten minutes at boiling point (100 °C, 212 °F). Insufficient cooking, such as in a slow cooker at 80 °C/ 176 °F, however, can increase the toxicity up to fivefold. To safely cook the beans, the U.S Food and Drug Administration recommends boiling for 30 minutes to ensure they reach a sufficient temperature for long enough to completely destroy the toxin. For dry beans, the FDA also recommends an initial soak of at least 5 hours in water which should then be discarded. Outbreaks of poisoning have been associated with cooking kidney beans in slow cookers.

The primary symptoms of phytohaemagglutinin poisoning are nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Onset is from one to three hours after consumption of improperly prepared beans, and symptoms typically resolve within a few hours. Consumption of as few as four or five raw, soaked kidney beans can cause symptoms. Canned red kidney beans, though, are safe to use immediately.

Beans are high in purines, which are metabolized to uric acid. Uric acid is not a toxin as such, but may promote the development or exacerbation of gout. So people with gout have been advised in the past to limit their consumption of beans. However, more recent research has questioned this association, finding that moderate intake of purine-rich foods is not associated with increased risk of gout.

Other uses:

Bean leaves have been used to trap bedbugs in houses. Microscopic hairs (trichomes) on the bean leaves entrap the insects. From ancient times, beans were used as device in various methods of divination. Fortune-telling using beans is called favomancy.”

Nutrient tables

The complete nutritional information, coverage of the daily requirement and comparison values with other ingredients can be found in the following nutrient tables.

Nutritional Information
per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Energy333 kcal
1'393 kJ
16.6%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 2000kcal
Fat/Lipids0.85 g1.2%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 70g
Saturated Fats0.22 g1.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 20g
Carbohydrates (inc.dietary fiber)60 g22.3%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 270g
Sugars2.1 g2.3%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 90g
Fiber15 g60.8%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 25g
Protein/Albumin23 g46.7%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 50g
Cooking Salt (Na:16.0 mg)41 mg1.7%
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA: 2.4g
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA.
Fat/Lipids
Carbohydrates
Protein/Albumin
Cooking Salt

Essential micronutrients with the highest proportions per 100g 2000 kcal
VitFolate, as the active form of folic acid (née vitamin B9 and 388 µg194.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 200 µg
ProtTryptophan (Trp, W) 0.28 g112.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.25 g
ProtThreonine (Thr, T) 0.98 g106.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.93 g
MinCopper, Cu 0.98 mg98.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.0 mg
ElemPotassium, K 1'795 mg90.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2'000 mg
MinManganese, Mn 1.8 mg90.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2.0 mg
ProtLysine (Lys, K) 1.6 g86.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.9 g
ProtIsoleucine (Ile, I) 1.0 g83.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.2 g
ProtPhenylalanine (Phe, F) 1.3 g81.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.6 g
ProtLeucine (Leu, L) 1.9 g77.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 2.4 g

Detailed micronutrients and daily requirement coverage per 100g

Explanations of nutrient tables in general

The majority of the nutritional information comes from the USDA (US Department of Agriculture). This means that the information for natural products is often incomplete or only given within broader categories, whereas in most cases products made from these have more complete information displayed.

If we take flaxseed, for example, the important essential amino acid ALA (omega-3) is only included in an overarching category whereas for flaxseed oil ALA is listed specifically. In time, we will be able to change this, but it will require a lot of work. An “i” appears behind ingredients that have been adjusted and an explanation appears when you hover over this symbol.

For Erb Muesli, the original calculations resulted in 48 % of the daily requirement of ALA — but with the correction, we see that the muesli actually covers >100 % of the necessary recommendation for the omega-3 fatty acid ALA. Our goal is to eventually be able to compare the nutritional value of our recipes with those that are used in conventional western lifestyles.

Essential fatty acids per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Alpha-Linolenic acid; ALA; 18:3 omega-3 0.17 g8.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the CH-EDI-Verordnung: 2.0 g
Linoleic acid; LA; 18:2 omega-6 0.20 g2.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the CH-EDI-Verordnung: 10 g

Essential amino acids per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Tryptophan (Trp, W) 0.28 g112.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.25 g
Threonine (Thr, T) 0.98 g106.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.93 g
Lysine (Lys, K) 1.6 g86.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.9 g
Isoleucine (Ile, I) 1.0 g83.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.2 g
Phenylalanine (Phe, F) 1.3 g81.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.6 g
Leucine (Leu, L) 1.9 g77.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 2.4 g
Valine (Val, V) 1.2 g76.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 1.6 g
Methionine (Met, M) 0.35 g38.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the WHO-Protein-2002: 0.93 g

Vitamins per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Folate, as the active form of folic acid (née vitamin B9 and 388 µg194.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 200 µg
Thiamine (vitamin B1) 0.44 mg40.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.1 mg
Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) 0.32 mg23.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.4 mg
Pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) 0.73 mg12.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 6.0 mg
Riboflavin (vitamin B2) 0.15 mg10.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.4 mg
Vitamin K 5.6 µg7.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 75 µg
Niacin (née vitamin B3) 0.48 mg3.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 16 mg
Vitamin E, as a-TEs 0.21 mg2.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 12 mg
Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) 0 mg< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 80 mg
Vitamin A, as RAE 0 µg< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 µg
Vitamin D 0 µg< 0.1%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 5.0 µg

Essential macroelements (macronutrients) per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Potassium, K 1'795 mg90.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2'000 mg
Magnesium, Mg 190 mg51.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 375 mg
Phosphorus, P 301 mg43.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 700 mg
Calcium, Ca 240 mg30.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 mg
Sodium, Na 16 mg2.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 800 mg

Essential trace elements (micronutrients) per 100g 2000 kcal

The numbers show the percent of the recommended daily value for a person who consumes 2000 cal per day. This number is for one serving of the recipe.

A person normally eats multiple times a day and consumes additional nutrients. You can get all of the nutrients you need over a longer period of time and in this way ensure a healthy balance.

Copper, Cu 0.98 mg98.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 1.0 mg
Manganese, Mn 1.8 mg90.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 2.0 mg
Iron, Fe 10 mg75.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 14 mg
Zinc, Zn 3.7 mg37.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 10 mg
Selenium, Se 13 µg23.0%
Recommended daily allowance according to the EU: LMIV-2011: 55 µg
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