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Diet and Health
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Curry leaf

Curry leaves, the leaves of the curry tree, are used mainly in India and Sri Lanka as a spice to season a wide variety of dishes, often vegetarian dishes.
Given the lack of nutritional information for this ingredient, we completed the nutrition table with values from reliable sources.
  Water 66.3%  78
Macronutrient carbohydrates 77.95%
/19
Macronutrient proteins 18.94%
/03
Macronutrient fats 3.11%
  LA : ALA

Omega-6 ratio to omega-3 fatty acids should not exceed a total of 5:1. Link to explanation.

Values are too small to be relevant.

Pictogram nutrient tables

Curry leaves are a popular spice used to prepare a wide variety of dishes. They are best with vegetable dishes, potatoes, lentils, chickpeas, fish, seafood, and lamb. They have a slightly spicy flavor and a fresh citrus aroma. Since drying leads to a considerable loss of flavor, it is best to use fresh curry leaves.

General information:
From Wikipedia: “The curry tree (Murraya koenigii) is a tropical to sub-tropical tree in the family Rutaceae (the rue family, which includes rue, citrus, and satinwood), which is native to India and Sri Lanka.

Its leaves are used in many dishes in India, Sri Lanka, and neighbouring countries. Often used in curries, the leaves are generally called by the name 'curry leaves', although they are also literally 'sweet neem leaves' in most Indian languages (as opposed to ordinary neem leaves which are very bitter and in the family Meliaceae, not Rutaceae).

Uses:
The leaves are highly valued as seasoning in southern and west-coast Indian cooking, and Sri Lankan cooking especially in curries, usually fried along with the chopped onion in the first stage of the preparation. In Sri Lanka curry tree is called Karapincha (කරපිංචා). They are also used to make thoran, vada, rasam and kadhi. In their fresh form, they have a short shelf life and do not keep well in the refrigerator. They are also available dried, though the aroma is largely inferior. They do, however, keep quite well frozen if well wrapped. Leaves can also be harvested from home-raised plants as it is also fairly easily grown in warmer areas of the world, or in containers where the climate is not supportive outdoors.

The leaves of Murraya koenigii are also used as an herb in Ayurvedic medicine. They are believed to possess anti-diabetic properties.

Although most commonly used in curries, leaves from the curry tree can be used in many other dishes to add flavour. In Cambodia, Khmer toast the leaves in an open flame or roast it until crispy and then crush it into a soured soup dish called Maju Krueng.

Murraya Koenigii, because of its aromatic characteristic properties, finds use and application in soap making ingredient, body lotions, diffusers, potpourri, scent, air fresheners, body fragrance, perfume, bath and massage oils, aromatherapy, towel scenting, spas and health clinics, incense, facial steams, hair treatments etc..

In the absence of tulsi leaves, curry leaves are used for rituals, such as pujas.

Retaining the flavor:
If you have the opportunity to purchase fresh leaves, freezing them is a good way to retain the flavor. Since drying causes a loss in flavor, you have to use larger amounts (at least twice as much as compared to fresh leaves) in order to achieve the same results.

Propagation:
Seeds must be ripe and fresh to plant; dried or shriveled fruits are not viable. One can plant the whole fruit, but it is best to remove the pulp before planting in potting mix that is kept moist but not wet.

Stem cuttings can be also used for propagation.

Chemical constituents:
Compounds found in curry tree leaves, stems, and seeds are include the alkaloids, mahanimbine, girinimbine, numerous carbazole alkaloids and cinnamaldehyde.

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