Foundation for Diet and Health

The best perspective for your health

The best perspective for your health

The best perspective for your health

The best perspective for your health

Japanese Miso Soup

Miso soup is a traditional Japanese dish that has become increasingly popular in the West. Its unique flavor comes from the fermented soybean paste (miso).
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vegan

20min   30min light
63/31/06  LA:ALA


Ingredients (for servings, )

For the soup base
2 Carrots, raw
(4.3 oz)
½ tspFresh ginger
(0.04 oz)
4 Button mushrooms, raw
(2.5 oz)
1 Zucchini, raw
(6.9 oz)
½ Scallion
(0.26 oz)
2 stalksCelery
(2.1 oz)
2 tbspWakame
(0.35 oz)
For the broth
1 literTap water
(35 oz)
6 tbspSoy sauce (tamari)
(3.8 oz)
3 tbspMiso
(1.8 oz)
For the seasoning and garnish
1 dashSalt
(0.01 oz)
1 dashBlack pepper
1 Lime
(2.4 oz)

Equipment

  • hand-held blender / immersion blender
    or blender
  • vegetable peeler
  • stove
  • saucepan

Type of preparation

  • cook
  • blend
  • season to taste
  • peel

Preparation

  1. For the soup broth
    Peel the carrots and ginger and wash the mushrooms, zucchini, scallions, and celery.

  2. Cut the vegetables into bite-size pieces and finely chop the ginger. Divide the wakame equally into the soup bowls.

  3. As an alternative to wakame, you can use a sheet of nori. Simply tear it into small pieces and divide into the bowls.

  4. Divide the chopped vegetable equally into the soup bowls.

  5. For the broth
    Combine the tamari and unpasteurized miso with a little water using a fork or an immersion blender to make a broth.

  6. Pour the broth into a larger container. Bring the remaining water to a boil and then let cool until the temperature is below 41°C.

  7. For the seasoning and garnish
    Combine the warm water with the broth, season to taste with salt and pepper, and pour on top of the vegetables in the individual soup bowls.

  8. Garnish each serving with a lemon wedge and serve the Japanese miso soup while it is still warm.

Recipes with nutrient tables


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Comments
Nice miso soup
Kerstin Gackle, image_from_year 2014 I just made this recipe and thought that the soup had a nice flavor — and it was also quite filling. For my kids, I added fried tofu cubes (not raw), and they really liked that.

Kerstin Gackle, 20/10/2016 20:13
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Book
Rohkost (Raw food)
Rohkost
Neun Zehn Verlag , Kristina Unterweger
Additional photos (3)
Ordering

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Notes about recipe

Iodine and algae: With algae, you should look and see how much iodine it contains. Iodine is an essential trace element that occurs primarily in the form of iodide and is especially important for the production of certain thyroid hormones. A deficiency can cause hypothyroidism, but if you consume too much it can overburden your thyroid and be harmful to your health. The type of iodine found in algae depends on the type of algae, time of harvest, location, and processing.

We don’t consider soy sauce or miso to be raw. Soybeans are generally heated during the production process since green beans of all types contain the glycoprotein phasin, which is toxic for humans. Phasin inhibits the absorption of nutrients in the intestine, causes hemagglutination (clumping of the red blood cells), and in larger amounts can destroy the intestinal villi. Heating processes (e.g., cooking and roasting) destroy phasin and make soybeans and soybean products such as tofu, miso, and tempeh edible for humans. As a result, even unpasteurized soy products are not actually raw, but are instead cooked products that have been “revived” through the process of fermentation. 

But at least one brand claims (with two years fermentation and without pasteurization) that its soy sauce is raw. On Soyana’s website, for example, we find the claim “SUITABLE FOR RAW FOOD even though the beans are cooked at the beginning of the production process and are then only ’revived’ via fermentation and not heated again.
I hope this explanation will be helpful for you and will make it clear that these outstanding fermented foods from Soyana have not been reheated but were cooked at the beginning of the process.”

This information should help you understand why we label this recipe as vegan cooked food even though it is listed as raw food in the cookbook it comes from. As a result of the high salt content, we do not regard the recipe to be “especially healthy.” 

High salt content: The higher salt content is primarily a result of the soy sauce (tamari) and miso contained in the soup. Consuming too much salt is very unhealthy and it is best to reduce the amount of salt you consume. A total of 2.5 g of table salt (1 g of sodium) per day is optimal, especially if you have high blood pressure. For an adult, ten tablespoons of pure table salt would be lethal. (You can click on the ingredient salt to read more).

Tips

Peeling ginger: It works best to peel ginger using the sharp outer edge of a spoon. With the outer edge of the spoon, you can scrape off only the brown skin and none of the inner yellow part is wasted.

Alternate preparation

Alternative to wakame: You can use nori sheets instead of wakame.