Foundation for Diet and Health

The best perspective for your health

The best perspective for your health

The best perspective for your health

The best perspective for your health

Red sorrel

Red sorrel has a sour taste and contains many natural chemicals, including oxalic acid. It is used to add flavor to sauces, soups, and salads.
  00/00/00  LA:ALA
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Red sorrel is a very common herb. It can be used as a spice raw or cooked. It is best to use when its leaves are green. If the leaves are red in color, this is a sign that it contains a high amount of oxalic acid. It blooms from May to the beginning of August.

General information:

From Wikipedia: “Rumex acetosella, commonly known as sheep's sorrel, red sorrel, sour weed and field sorrel, is a species of flowering plant in the buckwheat family Polygonaceae. The plant and its subspecies are common perennial weeds. It has green arrowhead-shaped leaves and red-tinted deeply ridged stems, and it sprouts from an aggressive and spreading rhizome. The flowers emerge from a tall, upright stem. Female flowers are maroon in color.

Distribution and habitat:

The plant is native to Eurasia and the British Isles, but it has been introduced to most of the rest of the Northern Hemisphere. It is commonly found on acidic, sandy soils in heaths and grassland. It is often one of the first species to take hold in disturbed areas, such as abandoned mining sites, especially if the soil is acidic. Livestock will graze on the plant, but it is not very nutritious and is toxic in large amounts because of oxalates. The American copper or small copper butterfly depends on it for food.”

Description:

“A perennial herb that has a slender and reddish upright stem that is branched at the top, reaching a height of 18 inches (0.5 meters). The arrow-shaped leaves are small, slightly longer than 1 inch (3 cm), and smooth with a pair of horizontal lobes at the base. It blooms during March to November, when yellowish-green (male) or reddish (female) flowers develop on separate plants at the apex of the stem, which develop into the red fruits (achenes).

Rumex acetosella is widely considered to be a hard-to-control noxious weed due to its spreading rhizome. Blueberry farmers are familiar with the weed because it thrives in the same conditions under which blueberries are cultivated.

Culinary uses:

There are several uses of sheep sorrel in the preparation of food including a garnish, a tart flavoring agent, a salad green, and a curdling agent for milk in cheese-making. The leaves have a lemony, tangy or nicely tart flavor. It is also known as sheep shower in parts of the country and there is a recipe for sheep shower wine online.”

​Interesting facts:

“The oldest fossil record of red sorrel comes from the Boreal/Atlantic and was found in 1931 near Moosburg (Baden-Württemberg, Germany). The oldest literary mention is by Johann Bauhin in the year 1592.*”

Note (italics): * = Translation from a German Wikipedia entry


Nutritional Information per 100g 2000 kCal
Energy n/a
Fat/Lipids n/a
Saturated Fats n/a
Carbohydrates (inc.dietary fiber) n/a
Sugars n/a
Fiber n/a
Protein (albumin) n/a
Cooking Salt n/a
Recommended daily allowance according to the GDA.
Fat/Lipids
Carbohydrates
Protein (albumin)
Cooking Salt

Essential Nutrients per 100g with %-share Daily Requirement at 2000 kCal

Detailed Nutritional Information per 100g for this Ingredient

The majority of the nutritional information comes from the USDA (US Department of Agriculture). This means that the information for natural products is often incomplete or only given within broader categories, whereas in most cases products made from these have more complete information displayed.

If we take flaxseed, for example, the important essential amino acid ALA (omega-3) is only included in an overarching category whereas for flaxseed oil ALA is listed specifically. In time, we will be able to change this, but it will require a lot of work. An “i” appears behind ingredients that have been adjusted and an explanation appears when you hover over this symbol.

For Erb Muesli, the original calculations resulted in 48 % of the daily requirement of ALA — but with the correction, we see that the muesli actually covers >100 % of the necessary recommendation for the omega-3 fatty acid ALA. Our goal is to eventually be able to compare the nutritional value of our recipes with those that are used in conventional western lifestyles.


Essential fatty acids, (SC-PUFA) 2000 kCal

Essential amino acids 2000 kCal

Vitamins 2000 kCal

Essential macroelements (macronutrients) 2000 kCal

Essential trace elements (micronutrients) 2000 kCal
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